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What is Euro 6?

Vehicle Ownership & Frequently Asked Questions

How Euro 6 diesel engines work

Diesel vehicles have never been cleaner than those produced today. The latest Euro 6 emissions standards and the limits that came before it have significantly reduced the amount of CO2 and NOx that are released. Manufacturers have worked hard to meet these restrictions by advancing their diesel technology, and here are some of the innovations that have been made.

Common Rail

Common rail will probably be a term you see often when searching for a new diesel car. It refers to technology that constantly injects fuel into the cylinder at a higher pressure, boosting the engine’s efficiency and cleanliness.

Diesel particulate filter (DPF)

Diesel particulate filters are an important part of the exhaust system that is fitted to all Euro 5 and Euro 6-compliant diesel models. They trap 99% of particulate matter (soot) released from the engine. The feature uses ceramic and metal honeycomb plates through which the engine’s exhaust fumes are passed. The filters collect the particulates rather than letting them escape into the atmosphere.

NOx after-treatment

Two main types of exhaust after-treatment have been developed to reduce the volume of NOx that diesel cars emit. The first is called selective catalytic reduction (SCR) which mixes urea with the exhaust gases to convert the NOx into clean and harmless nitrogen. The second is a NOx absorber catalyst (NAC) which removes NOx from exhaust gases through chemical absorption.

Autocatalyst

An autocatalyst is otherwise known as a catalytic converter. It contains a ceramic block coated in precious metals. When exhaust gasses pass through the block the hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide they contain are removed.

To find out more about Euro 6 and Ford's range of diesel engines, contact Gates Ford today.